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indiginous

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Organisation:CanNET/Cancer Australia
Comments:

A report generated when Cancer Australia contracted Cancer Council SA (CCSA) to review research and other initiatives aimed at improving cancer control in Aboriginal people. The overall objective of the review was to provide direction for reducing the disparities Aboriginal people experience across the cancer control continuum and thus improving their cancer outcomes.

Format:PDF file on website
Target audience: Multidisciplinary
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.canceraustralia.gov.au/clinical-best-practice/service-delivery/cannet/population-groups-poorer-outcomes
Updated date:2013
Organisation:Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
Comments:

Written by Shaouli Shahid and Sandra C. Thompson and published in Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health (2009, 33(2):109-118), the abstract is as follows:

Objective: Cancer among Indigenous populations in the developed world appears to have increased over past few decades. This article explores issues related to cancer among the Indigenous populations of Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the US and examines variations in the epidemiology, Indigenous peoples' perceptions about cancer and potential effects on care-seeking behaviour.

Methods: A search of peer-reviewed journal articles, government reports, published and unpublished theses and other grey literature was undertaken using electronic databases and citation snowballing. Both epidemiological and qualitative studies were included.

Results: Cancer in Indigenous populations in these four countries is characterised by high incidence and mortality rates for specific cancers and lower survival rates as a result of late diagnosis, lower participation and poorer compliance with treatment. A higher prevalence of many cancer risk factors occurs across these populations. Fear of death, fatalism, payback, shame and other spiritual and cultural issues are reported in the few qualitative studies examining Indigenous beliefs and understanding of cancer which undoubtedly influences participation in cancer screening and treatment.

Conclusions and implications: The holistic approach (physical, mental, emotional and spiritual) to healing and well-being, and the concept that individual, family and community are inseparable underpin Indigenous care-seeking behaviour. Further community-based research is needed to increase understanding of the needs of Indigenous people with cancer, and to guide policy and practice towards more supportive and effective care.

The full article is available in PDF on the site.

Format:PDF file on website
Target audience: Multidisciplinary
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1753-6405.2009.00355.x/abstract
Updated date:2009
Organisation:Cancer Causes and Control Journal
Comments:

Written by Condon, J., Armstrong, B., Barnes, A. & Cunningham, J. 2003, ‘Cancer in Indigenous Australians: a review’, Cancer Causes and Control, vol. 14, no. 2, pp 109-121, the abstract is as follows:

Objectives: To summarize for the first time evidence of the impact of cancer on Indigenous Australians.

Methods: Medline search of peer-reviewed scientific journals, and extensive search of reports of government agencies, publications of cancer registries and non-government organizations, and other non-peer-reviewed sources.

Results: Indigenous Australians have much higher incidence rates than other Australians of cancers of the lung, liver, and cervix; but much lower rates of cancers of the breast, colon and rectum, prostate, melanoma of skin, and lymphoma. Some of these differences can be explained, in part at least, by differences in risk factor prevalence. Indigenous Australians also have higher mortality and lower survival from cancer as a whole than other Australians. More advanced disease at diagnosis, and possibly poorer treatment, are partly responsible for these differences, but other factors may also be involved.

Conclusions: Less accessible and less effective health programs are as great a problem for cancer control as for other aspects of Indigenous health in Australia. Major improvements in preventive services, screening, primary care, and specialist treatment services are required to reduce cancer incidence and improve cancer outcomes for Australia's Indigenous people.

Format:Published, refereed journal article
Target audience: Multidisciplinary
Accessibility:Abstract is freely available
Cost:
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.springerlink.com/content/p1136031j06q831p/
Updated date:2003
Organisation:Australian Journal of Rural Health
Comments:

"I Don’t Want to Be in That Big City; This Is My Country Here:Research Findings on Aboriginal Peoples Preference to Die At Home" was written by Pam McGrath and published in Australian Journal of Rural Health (2007, 15,4:264-268), the abstract is as follows:

Objective: The present article provides findings from a two-year study on Indigenous palliative care conducted in the Northern Territory that explored and documented wishes in relation to place of death for rural and remote Aboriginal people.

Design: Qualitative, open-ended interviews, audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and thematically analysed.

Participants: There were a total of 72 interviews completed with Indigenous patients (n = 10), Indigenous caregivers (n = 19), Indigenous and non-Indigenous health care workers (n = 41), and interpreters (n = 2).

Results: The findings provide a clear articulation of the wish of Aboriginal people from rural and remote areas to die at home connected to land and family. Strong cultural reasons were given for this preference, including the strong connection with land and community, a belief in ‘death country’, the importance of passing on sacred knowledge to the appropriate family member, the significance of ensuring that the dying individual's ‘animal spirit’ is able to return to the land, and the imperative that the ‘right person’ in the family network is available to provide the care.

Conclusion: The strong wish to die at home informs the importance of building up local health and palliative care services and avoiding, where possible, the need for relocation for health care to the major metropolitan hospitals during end-of-life care.

The full article is available in PDF on the site.

Format:PDF file on website
Target audience: Specialist - Paliative Care
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1440-1584.2007.00904.x/abstract
Updated date:2007
Organisation:Lancet Oncology
Comments:

Written by Cunningham, J., Rumbold, A., Zhang, X. & Condon, J. 2008, ‘Incidence, aetiology, and outcomes of cancer in Indigenous peoples in Australia’, and published in Lancet Oncology, vol. 9, no. 6, pp 585-95; the abstract is as follows:

"An assessment of recent data on cancer in Indigenous Australians (Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders) shows that, although they are less likely to have some types of cancer than other Australians, Indigenous people are significantly more likely to have cancers that have a poor prognosis, but are largely preventable, such as lung and liver cancer. Indigenous people with cancer are diagnosed at a later stage, are less likely to receive adequate treatment, and are more likely to die from their cancers than other Australians. Inadequate identification of Indigenous people in cancer registers precludes reporting for some parts of Australia, but sufficient information is available to identify priorities and inform appropriate remedial action. Health-risk factors, especially smoking, and inadequate health-system performance largely explain the patterns of cancer incidence and mortality in areas with adequate data. Effective tobacco control programmes, improvements across a range of health services, and meaningful Indigenous engagement are all needed to decrease the burden of cancer in Indigenous Australians".

Format:Published, refereed journal article
Target audience: Multidisciplinary
Accessibility:Abstract is freely available
Cost:
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18510990
Updated date:2008
Organisation:Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet
Comments:

References and links to the key publications about cancer among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia.

Format:PDF file on website
Target audience: Multidisciplinary
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/chronic-conditions/cancer/publications/key-references
Updated date:2011
Organisation:Australian Institute of Health and Welfare
Comments:
This resource sheet discusses the harms resulting from tobacco use in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and evidence-based approaches to reducing this harm. To be effective, strategies to reduce tobacco use need to acknowledge the historical context for its use, as well as the many socioeconomic influences. Tobacco interventions that have been developed by and/or for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and interventions that may be suitable for translation for use in such communities are considered. To ensure that program delivery meets the highest standard it should involve the community in design, delivery and evaluation.
Format:PDF file on website
Target audience: Health Professionals
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.aihw.gov.au/closingthegap/documents/resource_sheets/ctgc-rs04.pdf
Updated date:2011
Organisation:NHMRC National Breast Cancer Centre and Cancer Australia
Comments:

Published in 1996, this was the first report summarising all of the available information about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and breast cancer on an Australian basis.

Information is included about Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and breast cancer regarding:

  • demographic characteristics and risk profile;
  • incidence of, and mortality from, breast cancer;
  • the early detection of breast cancer;
  • knowledge, attitudes, and perceived needs in relation to breast cancer; and,
  • conclusions and recommendations. 

 

Format:PDF file on website
Target audience: Health Professionals
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.canceraustralia.gov.au/publications-resources/cancer-australia-publications/breast-cancer-and-aboriginal-and-torres-strait
Updated date:2012
Organisation:Cancer Council Victoria
Comments:

A range of brochures and posters educating Indigenous Australians about the detection of cancer, particularly cervical cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer, and the prevention of cancer through initiatives such as quitting smoking.

The site also contains links to other Indigenous organisations and resources.

Format:PDF file on website
Target audience: Multidisciplinary
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.cancervic.org.au/preventing-cancer/aboriginal-health/indigenous-resources
Updated date:2013
Organisation:Committee of Deans of Australian Medical Schools (CDAMS)
Comments:

The CDAMS Indigenous Health Curriculum Framework was published in 2004 and was developed in close consultation with medical educators, Indigenous health specialists, the Australian Indigenous Doctors Association, medical colleges, student bodies, and other stakeholder organisations such as the Australian Rural Health Education Network.

Its purpose is to provide a set of guidelines for medical schools to aid the development and delivery of Indigenous health content in core medical education. It is recognised that this is an emerging field and that medical schools are at differing stages of curriculum development. This document seeks to enunciate the basic components of a functional curriculum for delivering Indigenous health effectively.

Format:PDF file on website
Target audience: Multidisciplinary
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.limenetwork.net.au/content/curriculum-framework
Updated date:2004
Organisation:Cancer Australia
Comments:

An information brochure developed specifically for Aborignal and Torres Strait Islander Communities with information about identifying the symptoms, treating and managing lymphoedema, a chronic swelling that can occur in the body after cancer treatment.

Format:PDF file on website
Target audience: Aborignal and Torres Strait Islander Communities
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.canceraustralia.gov.au/publications-resources/cancer-australia-publications/atsi-lymphoedemea-brochure
Updated date:2012
Organisation:Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing
Comments:

The National Strategic Framework of the Australian Government for implementation 2007 - 2013 to ensure that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples enjoy a healthy life equal to that of the general population that is enriched by a strong living culture, dignity and justice.

Format:PDF file on website
Target audience: Health Service Administration
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/59E57ED5E8E63C04CA2574040004878A/$File/nsfatsihimp2.pdf
Updated date:2011
Organisation:Cancer Australia
Comments:

This resource is designed specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and health professionals who work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. It has been developed to support Health Workers to run a Well Women Workshop to provide Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women with the information they should know about breast changes and breast screening to encourage and enable women to be proactive about breast health.

The resource includes advice for the workshop organiser, presenter notes, resources to organise and run the workshop, including NBOCC’s What every Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander woman should know DVD, and health promotion materials including the Looking after your breasts flyer (pdf 1mB).

Format:Workshop toolkit
Target audience: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers and health professionals who work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.canceraustralia.gov.au/affected-cancer/cancer-types/breast-cancer/about-breast-cancer/aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-women/aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-health
Updated date:2013
Organisation:Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education
Comments:

Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education is Australia’s largest Indigenous tertiary education and training centre.

Batchelor offers a range of nursing and health courses to allow Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people the chance to study a wide range of courses designed to help them gain the skills and qualifications needed to find work and to help with the development of their communities, particularly those following traditional ways of life.

All the Institute’s courses are developed with the help of many people from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations, and employer groups.


Batchelor offers short blocks of study on-campus combined with study at home. This allows you to keep strong links with your communities and study some parts of your course in your community so that do not have to leave your home community for months at a time for study.

Some students leave their communities for one to three weeks workshops or classes at the Institute’s campuses in Batchelor or at Annexes in Darwin, Nhulunbuy, Katherine and Tennant. Some workshops are also held in other communities.

Courses offered by the Institute are taught by areas that specialise in that discipline. The Institute teaches courses in the areas of education and humanities, health and sciences, community studies and community education and training.


Information for future students and application details are available: here.

Format:Higher Education Courses/VET Qualifications
Target audience: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) students and health professionals
Accessibility:Applications accepted
Cost:
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.batchelor.edu.au/about/faculties/fhbs/
Updated date:2012
Organisation:The University of Sydney
Comments:

Byalawa is a learning and teaching resource for working with Indigenous patients and clients.

The Byalawa resources are research-based multimedia learning and teaching resources designed to facilitate the acquisition of appropriate, culturally safe interviewing and case history taking skills in health profession students.

Format:Website - educational resource
Target audience: All medical practitioners
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.byalawa.com/
Updated date:2012
Organisation:The Cancer Council NSW
Comments:

The Cancer Council NSW has developed a resource to train Aboriginal Health Workers in the causes, treatment and support of Aboriginal people with cancer.

Developed in consultation with Aboriginal Health Workers across NSW, the package is a comprehensive training resource for Aboriginal Health Workers to plan and facilitate workshops for their colleagues.

Written in plain language, the package is based on successful workshops held across NSW in recent years.

The resource includes a facilitator‘s manual, which contains all the instructions and information for delivering the workshop, and a CD-ROM, which contains a Powerpoint slide show presentation and a master copy of the course workbook for participants.

Format:Training resource (modular)
Target audience: Multidisciplinary
Accessibility:Health professionals only
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.cancercouncil.com.au/31058/get-informed/about/aboriginal-health/cancer-awareness-for-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-health-workers/?pp=31058
Updated date:2012
Organisation:The Cancer Council QLD
Comments:

 

The aim of the course is to increase the cancer-related knowledge of participants by providing information about cancer and cancer treatment.  Any Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker who cares for people with cancer and their families can apply to attend the course. Entry to the course is by application (download from website).

Format:Face-to-face
Target audience: Multidisciplinary
Accessibility:Health professionals only
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL: http://cancerqld.org.au/page/need_support/education_programs/aboriginal_and_torres_strait_islander__health_worker_courses/
Updated date:2014
Organisation:Cancer Council WA
Comments:

The Cancer Education Course for Aboriginal Health Professionals aims to provide education and skills training about cancer:

  • To increase the participants' understanding and knowledge of cancer prevention, treatment and impact of the disease
  • To improve the care of Aboriginal people with cancer in Western Australia
  • To develop a statewide network amongst Aboriginal Health Professionals caring for people with cancer.

Topics covered in the 5-day program include: how cancer develops, the types of cancers affecting Aboriginal people, cancer treatment, palliative care, cancer prevention, and early detection of the disease.

Any Aboriginal Health Professionals (male or female) who care for people with cancer and their families in Western Australia can apply to attend the course. This includes Aboriginal Health Workers, Liaison Officers, Nurses, Health Promotion Officers and Aboriginal people who work in other health-related areas.

Cancer Council WA will cover:

  • Travel expenses (all courses are conducted in Perth)
  • Accommodation, all meals and transfers
  • Course registration
  • Study notes

For further information, please contact Tracey Eades on 9388 4382, Emma Croager on 9388 4347 or email education@cancerwa.asn.au

Format:Face-to-face
Target audience: Indigenous health professionals
Accessibility:Aboriginal Health Professionals (male or female) who care for people with cancer and their families in Western Australia
Cost:
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.cancerwa.asn.au/professionals/aboriginalhealth/
Updated date:2010
Organisation:Aboriginal Health Council of WA - AHCWA
Comments:

Cultural safety training (CST) aims to improve the quality of service delivered by health care providers to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and the experience of service for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Ultimately cultural safety training should lead to better health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Five CST modules have been developed covering a range of topics relating to cultural safety with which health care professionals working in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health should be familiar.

The modules and Facilitator Manual were produced with the supervision and involvement of a local advisory group and a National Cultural Safety Training Reference Group.

The modules are:

  • Module One: Introduction to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health - Designed to help health professionals understand the historical and cultural context of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health care
  • Module Two: Better Consultations - Designed to help health professionals improve their communication with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the context of the consultation, including activities around Identification methods
  • Module Three: Prevention and Health Checks - Designed to focus on prevention, Medicare items for preventative health checks and addressing the challenge of the burden of chronic disease in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities
  • Module Four: Linking with other Service Providers - Designed to help health professionals adopt a comprehensive primary health care approach to the care of Aboriginal people
  • Module Five: Leadership in Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Health- Designed to help health professionals gain the skills and motivation to get involved in partnerships for better primary health care of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Lesson plans including learning outcomes, can be downloaded from the site.

Registered participants must complete a pre-workshop learning needs assessment form before their workshop and complete pre-workshop reading before attending CST.

Modules have been designed with suggested session activities but the package is a framework that requires workshop facilitators to supplement locally designed learning activities to tailor a workshop to the needs of the participants as addressed in their Pre-Workshop Needs Assessment.

The modules have been adjudicated under the RACGP‘s QA&CPD Program as an Active Learning Module and accrue 40 Category 1 points for the completion of 2 modules.

Format:Training workshop: face to face
Target audience: Health professionals
Accessibility:Cultural Safety Training can be convened anywhere in the country and all health professionals are eligible. Contact Juliette Hubbard on (08) 9227 1631 to book a workshop or discuss facilitator training.
Cost:
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.culturalsafetytraining.com.au/
Updated date:2009
Organisation:Australian General Practice Network, Royal College of Nursing Australia and Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education
Comments:

In partnership with Royal College of Nursing Australia (RCNA) and Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education, the Australian General Practice Network have released a new professional development elearning module for practice nurses and registered Aboriginal Health Workers on the RCNA professional development site, 3LP, the e-Learning Training Package for Medicare Item 10997.

Medicare Item 10997 relates to the provision of monitoring and support to people with a chronic disease care plan, by a practice nurse or registered Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker on behalf of a general practitioner.

The elearning package is designed to enhance the role of practice nurses and Aboriginal Health Workers providing this service to patients with a chronic disease, including cancer, to support GPs to provide quality care to patients and to assist general practitioners to feel confident that practice nurses and registered Aboriginal Health Workers who successfully undertake the e-learning package are appropriately qualified and trained to provide monitoring and support for patients with a chronic disease care plan.

Format:Website - education
Target audience: Practice nurses, registered Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.3lp.rcna.org.au/10997/
Updated date:2012
Organisation:gplearning
Comments:

The Introduction to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural awareness in general practice activity aims to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples by enhancing the cultural awareness of general practitioners (GPs), general practice staff, primary health care staff, and other health care providers. Medical students will also benefit.

For further information and resources developed by the RACGP in this area, please see this fact sheet, the National Guide to Aboriginal Health or order RACGP's educational DVDs.

Format:Online learning activity
Target audience: General Practice
Accessibility:Professional organisations/organisation members only
Cost:
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.gplearning.com.au/sumtotal/app/management/LMS_LearnerHome.aspx
Updated date:2013
Organisation:Cancer Australia
Comments:

The Management of secondary lymphoedema: workshop module for Indigenous health workers aims to provide Indigenous health workers with an understanding of the management of secondary lymphoedema, and is designed to be delivered as part of a comprehensive cancer training module for Indigenous health workers.

It is intended that the module be delivered by an Indigenous health worker or educator and lymphoedema practitioner. The presenters’ notes include tips for planning, promoting and delivering the workshop.

The CD-ROMs for the workshop include:

Order:

If your organisation is interested in running a lymphoedema educational training program for health professionals or Indigenous health workers, please contact 1800 624 973 to order a copy of the relevant module.

Format:Workshop (one off)
Target audience: Indigenous health workers
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.canceraustralia.gov.au/clinical-best-practice/lymphoedema/information-workshop-organisers/workshops-indigenous-health-workers
Updated date:2013
Organisation:The Cancer Council VIC
Comments:

The Cancer Council Victoria works closely with Aboriginal organisations, health workers, government and businesses to target cancer prevention messages to Victorian Aboriginal communities.

Activities include:

  • Education programs to reduce the risk of cancer;
  • Research to reduce the burden of cancer on future generations; Information and support for cancer patients, their families, carers, and health professionals; 
  • Creating culturally appropriate resources through community consultation and using local artists.

A number of brochures and web resources are available for download targeted at Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander health from: http://www.cancervic.org.au/preventing-cancer/aboriginal-health/useful_links_aboriginal_resources/

Format:Website - information
Target audience: Multidisciplinary
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.cancervic.org.au/preventing-cancer/aboriginal-health/indigenous-resources
Updated date:2013
Organisation:Aboriginal Resource and Development Service (ARDS) Inc
Comments:

ARDS Inc has produced a multi-part, 2 series cancer program as part of the Chronic Disease related educational programs broadcast on the Yolngu Radio Service.

Series One features 9 parts:

  • Common Cancers (7 min, 56 secs)
  • Risk (7 min, 44 secs)
  • Summary (2 min, 49 secs)
  • Symptoms (10 min, 56 secs)
  • Cells (8 min, 44 secs)
  • DNA (8 min, 28 secs)
  • Breaking DNA (8 min, 28 secs)
  • Lung and Liver Cancer: What breaks DNA? (10 min, 27 secs)
  • Treatment (10 min, 59 secs)

Series Two contains 3 parts, featuring Daphne Munurrgitj discussing her breast cancer journey with Dr Alyssa Vass (Galikali) and Joy Bulkanhawuy.

  • Part One (5 min, 42 secs) - symptoms, testing, referral and diagnosis
  • Part Two (11 min,36 secs) - treatment options, surgery, chemotherapy
  • Part Three (5 min, 47 secs) - follow up care and survivorship
Format:Audio/MP3
Target audience: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) health professionals, patients and professionals working with ATSI communities
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.ards.com.au/www.ards.com.au/health_chronic.htm
Updated date:2013
Organisation:Aboriginal & Islander Health Worker Journal
Comments:

The Aboriginal & Islander Health Worker Journal is the only national publication written by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers. The Journal is distributed nationally and internationally and has been in circulation since 1977. It is published six times a year and has broad range of readership.

Each issue covers a range of topics including primary health care, community profiles, health promotion, best practice models and workforce issues. 

The principle aims of the Journal are:

  • To provide Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers up to date and accurate health information in a form that is both relevant and accessible
  • To provide a link and contact for health workers throughout Australia
  • To provide a vehicle for health workers to discuss health issues and programs from a community perspective
  • To promote and highlight the valuable work health workers are carrying out at the community level
  • To provide a cross-cultural resource for non-Indigenous readers who work with and provide services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.
Format:Refereed journal
Target audience: Health professionals working in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander service provision.
Accessibility:Publicly available
Cost:Payment required
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.aihwj.com.au/
Updated date:2010
Organisation:Cancer Council NSW and Aboriginal Health & Medical Research Council of NSW
Comments:

Aboriginal Cancer Journeys: Our stories of kinship, hope and survival is a book of stories from Aboriginal people affected by cancer. It includes personal insights and words of wisdom so Aboriginal people can get an insight into other people’s experience of cancer. Eight fact sheets with easy-to-read information about cancer, its treatment and side effects are also available.

Format:PDF file on website
Target audience: Indigenous consumers and health professionals
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.cancercouncil.com.au/1904/get-informed/about/aboriginal-health/living-with-cancer-3/?pp=1904
Updated date:2012
Organisation:Aboriginal Resource and Development Service (ARDS) Inc
Comments:

Dictionary of Anatomy - Dhäruk Mala ga Mayali' Rumbalpuy provides explanations of many body parts in plain English and the Djambarrpuyŋu language. It also includes innovative full colour graphics and examples of related pathology.

This is a vital resource for Indigenous Health Workers, Interpreters and Health professionals working with Yolŋu people who speak the Djambarrpuyŋu language.

The book can be ordered online from ARDS Inc. Students and bulk orders may receive a discount.

Format:Printed resource
Target audience: Multidisciplinary
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Payment required
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.ards.com.au/www.ards.com.au/healthdictionary/lexicon/main.htm
Updated date:2013
Organisation:National Breast and Ovarian Cancer Centre (NBOCC)
Comments:

DVD resource and booklet for health professionals featuring Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women sharing their experiences of breast cancer.

Format:DVD and booklet
Target audience: Multidisciplinary
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://canceraustralia.gov.au/publications-resources/cancer-australia-publications/my-story-dvd
Updated date:2013
Organisation:Centre for Excellence in Indigenous Tobacco Control
Comments:

This tobacco control resource kit for Indigenous Australian communities aims: 

  • To assist health professionals, along with community and education workers, to become community leaders in the area of tobacco control.
  • To raise the priority of tobacco control in Indigenous communities.
  • To build community ownership in tobacco control by supporting community-initiated and controlled action.

A practical manual, which encourages community action, the kit is full of information for health professionals, but particularly Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workers, to further develop their tobacco control knowledge.

The kit draws on the knowledge of many individuals and organisations working in the area of tobacco control, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health, community health and health promotion. It is a tool box of helpful information, ideas, activities, success stories, and reference materials.

Format:PDF file on website
Target audience: Health professionals working with indigenous australians
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.ceitc.org.au/talkin-good-air-health-worker-resource-kit
Updated date:2013
Organisation:CanNET NT and NT Government Department of Health and Families
Comments:

A downloadable booklet that has been developed by the CanNET NT project about the cancer journey for use in Aboriginal communities, produced in 5 indigenous languages as well as English.

A DVD that reflects the content of the booklet is also available.

Hard copy booklets and DVDs can be ordered from Northern Territory Department of Health and Families: http://www.health.nt.gov.au/Contacts/index.aspx?id=963

Format:Web-based PDF
Target audience: Health professionals
Accessibility:Publicly available
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.cancerlearning.gov.au/docs/indig_can_journey.pdf
Updated date:2009
Organisation:Cancer Council WA
Comments:

Information regarding the risks, screening and treatment of bowel cancer, and cancer in general, designed specifically for the Indigenous population.

Format:PowerPoint presentation
Target audience: Indigenous Australians and health professionals working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au/files/user46/Emma_Croager.pdf
Updated date:2011
Organisation:Cancer Australia
Comments:

The National Breast and Ovarian Cancer Centre (NBOCC) is committed to working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to provide women with important information about breast cancer awareness, early detection as well as breast cancer treatment and care.

Information is provided specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women regarding:

Format:Website - information only
Target audience: Multidisciplinary
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.canceraustralia.gov.au/affected-cancer/cancer-types/breast-cancer/about-breast-cancer/aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-women
Updated date:2013
Organisation:BreastScreen WA
Comments:

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Resources have been developed at BreastScreen WA for two audiences: workers in the health area and community women.

The messages emphasised on the resources are

  • Beat Breast Cancer - Have a Free X-ray
  • Stay Strong and Healthy For You and Your Family
  • Regular Breast X-rays save lives.

BreastScreen WA produces a range of free printed materials to inform women about the importance of screening mammography.

Some resources can be downloaded from the website, or to order any of these resources, contact BreastScreen WA.

Format:Website - information
Target audience: Multidisciplinary
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.breastscreen.health.wa.gov.au/aboriginal/index.cfm
Updated date:2009
Organisation:The University of Sydney
Comments:

Byalawa is a learning and teaching resource for working with Indigenous patients and clients.

The Byalawa resources are research-based multimedia learning and teaching resources designed to facilitate the acquisition of appropriate, culturally safe interviewing and case history taking skills in health profession students.

Format:Website - educational resource
Target audience: All medical practitioners
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.byalawa.com/
Updated date:2012
Organisation:The Cancer Council NSW
Comments:

The Cancer Council NSW has developed a resource to train Aboriginal Health Workers in the causes, treatment and support of Aboriginal people with cancer.

Developed in consultation with Aboriginal Health Workers across NSW, the package is a comprehensive training resource for Aboriginal Health Workers to plan and facilitate workshops for their colleagues.

Written in plain language, the package is based on successful workshops held across NSW in recent years.

The resource includes a facilitator‘s manual, which contains all the instructions and information for delivering the workshop, and a CD-ROM, which contains a Powerpoint slide show presentation and a master copy of the course workbook for participants.

Format:Training resource (modular)
Target audience: Multidisciplinary
Accessibility:Health professionals only
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.cancercouncil.com.au/31058/get-informed/about/aboriginal-health/cancer-awareness-for-aboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-health-workers/?pp=31058
Updated date:2012
Organisation:NSW Cervical Screening Program
Comments:

The NSW Cervical Screening Program and BreastScreen NSW have worked with Aboriginal stakeholders to develop the Live Strong and Healthy resources and A Message to Aboriginal Women.

Thess resources provides information about Pap tests and issues related to Cervical Screening and offers ways in which workers can introduce the subject of the Pap test to Aboriginal women in a culturally appropriate way. It aims to encourage Aboriginal women to have two yearly Pap tests by providing information about:

  • The parts of the body that involved in a Pap test
  • What a Pap test is and how it is done
  • Who should have a Pap test, and how often
  • Getting Pap test results
  • What happens if a Pap test is abnormal
  • Treatment options
  • The importance of follow up treatment

The resource has been designed as a small group discussion activity and consists of facilitator notes, a set of overheads and a booklet for women. Booklets can be downloaded from the website.

Please call the Program on 131 556 if you would like more information about this resource and the way it is intended to be used.

Format:Website - information
Target audience: Multidisciplinary
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.csp.nsw.gov.au/aboriginal
Updated date:2013
Organisation:HealthInfoNet
Comments:

This web resource aims to increase the access of people involved in addressing the development and impact of cancer among Indigenous peoples to accurate, up-to-date information and resources.

In aiming to provide access to good quality knowledge, information and resources for people involved in addressing cancer among Indigenous peoples, this web resource includes:

  • reviews
  • guidelines
  • resources
  • programs, projects and lessons
  • policies and strategies
  • publications
  • links

It also includes information about research activity, organisations, agencies and individuals working in the field.

Format:Website - information
Target audience: Multidisciplinary
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au/chronic-conditions/cancer
Updated date:2010
Organisation:Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing
Comments:

The Minister for Indigenous Health, the Hon Warren Snowdon, launched the new GP Resource Kit on 9 December 2010 at the Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory.

The GP Resource Kit is a tool for doctors, health professionals and staff working in Indigenous health services and general practices to understand how to access and make the most of the new initiatives in the Indigenous Chronic Disease Package.

Also available is the Indigenous Chronic Disease Package Annual Progress Report 2009-10.

The Annual Progress Report highlights the first twelve months of progress in implementing the Indigenous Chronic Disease Package.

Format:PDF file on website
Target audience: Multidisciplinary
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.health.gov.au/internet/ctg/publishing.nsf/Content/home-1
Updated date:2010
Organisation:The Cancer Council QLD
Comments:

The 'Let‘s talk about living with cancer' brochure and poster have been developed specifically for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Format:Web-based PDF
Target audience: Multidisciplinary
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.cancerqld.org.au/pdf/Letstalkaboutlivingwithcancerbrochure_000.pdf
Updated date:2009
Organisation:Northern Territory Government Department of Local Government and Housing
Comments:

The Aboriginal Interpreter Service helps to alleviate the language barriers faced by Indigenous persons throughout the Northern Territory particularly in relation to health and legal issues.

The Service was established in April 2000 and maintains and utilises a register of Aboriginal interpreters and languages in the Northern Territory. It provides an Aboriginal Language Interpreter Service for government and non-government agencies that require on-site Aboriginal language interpreters.

The Aboriginal Interpreter Service provides a 24 hours 7 days a week.

There is a central booking service: Darwin Tel: (08) 8999 8353;

Alice Springs Tel: (08) 8951 5576

Format:Website - educational tool
Target audience: Health care professionals
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.ais.nt.gov.au/
Updated date:2013
Organisation:Department of Health and Aging
Comments:

Also known as the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples Palliative Care Resource Kit, this publication provides strategies and training material to support staff in mainstream health services to provide culturally appropriate palliative care to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Format:Website - information only
Target audience: Specialist - Paliative Care
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/palliativecare-pubs-indig-resource.htm
Updated date:2010
Organisation:NT Department of Health & Community Services
Comments:

The Well Women‘s Cancer Screening (previously Women‘s Cancer Prevention Program) was established in 1994 to implement the National Cervical Screening Program and BreastScreen Australia in the NT. The program has adopted a holistic approach to women‘s screening which incorporates the cervical and breast screening programs into a well women‘s screening model.

This model is particularly appropriate for the expressed needs of Aboriginal women in the NT who are the major target group for the Cervical Screening Program.

Resources are available to order via the website.

Format:Website - information
Target audience: Multidisciplinary
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.health.nt.gov.au/Womens_Health/Well_Womens_Cancer_Screening/
Updated date:2008
Organisation:The National Cancer Nursing Education Project (EdCaN)
Comments:

 

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander viewers are advised that the following resource may contain images and voices of people who have died.

These competencies include recognition of the critical interdependence between the roles of the SCN, other health professionals and organisations and the establishment of partnerships with people affected by cancer to maximise outcomes.

The resource contains three sections:

Section one: Epidemiology provides an overview of the epidemiology of cancer in Indigenous populations, looks at cultural factors affecting cancer control in Indigenous communities, and discusses health and health policy for Indigenous Australians.

Section two: Constructs of cultural safety presents information on cultural safety and respect, effective communication, and describes a number of characteristics unique to Indigenous cultures. It reviews factors contributing to the inequalities of cancer outcomes for Indigenous people and provides a cultural appraisal framework.

Section three: Nursing care for Indigenous people with cancer examines the ability of the Specialist Cancer Nurse (SCN) to recognise factors that influence Indigenous peoples' attitudes toward cancer, and use cancer prevention programs and other resources developed for Indigenous people. It examines nursing interventions to meet the health needs of Indigenous people affected by cancer.

Format:Online learning resource containing videos
Target audience: Multidisciplinary - Nursing and Allied health
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.cancerlearning.gov.au/edcan_resources/#/xml/module_4
Updated date:2010
Organisation:Queensland Health
Comments:

A brochure describing the opportunities available for Indigenous Australians wishing to commence or further their career in nursing. The brochure includes details of university courses and scholarships available to assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders to gain nursing qualifications.

Format:PDF file on website
Target audience: Indigenous health care workers, consumers
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.thinknursing.com/files/pdf/indigenous/indigenous_nursing_career.pdf
Updated date:2008
Organisation:Australian Indigenous Doctors Association (AIDA)
Comments:

A professional organisation for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander medical students and graduates.

Format:Professional body
Target audience: Indigenous physicians
Accessibility:Publicly available - no restrictions
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.aida.org.au/
Updated date:2010
Organisation:Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses
Comments:

The Congress of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses (CATSIN) was founded to formally represent Indigenous nurses, with a commitment to the implementation of the recommendations regarding the public and private sectors, the higher education sector and primary, secondary and tertiary health delivery mechanisms made at The National Forum for Development of Strategies to Increase the Numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples in Nursing, held in August 1997.

CATSIN is a strong and highly credible voice for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Nurses within the general health community.

CATSIN advocates for:

  • recognition of the unique contributions and commitment of indigenous nurses in the area of health
  • acknowledgment of cultural expertise/knowledge that indigenous nurses contribute to the health industry and nursing profession
  • the promotion and implementation of indigenous nurse employment strategies, with particular attention given to culturally safe interview and selection procedures
  • funding opportunities to progress the aims and objectives of CATSIN to ministers of health, state and federal health authorities, nursing bodies, universities and NACCHO
  • promotion of the professional issues raised by member nurses to appropriate professional bodies
  • encouragement and support of indigenous nurses' participation in nursing research, thus promoting indigenous perspectives
  • continued promotion of the status of the indigenous nurse.

CATSIN runs conferences and events and offers bursaries and educational opportunities.

An online forum is available for members.

Format:Professional body
Target audience: Indigenous nurses
Accessibility:Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander registered, student, enrolled and retired nurses
Cost:
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://catsin.org.au/
Updated date:2013
Organisation:IAHA -Indigenous Allied Health Australia
Comments:

The Indigenous Allied Health Australia (IAHA) is the peak body for indigenous allied health professionals. The website is for Indigenous allied health professionals and students wishing to network together, share information and ideas and join in planning the establishment of an Indigenous allied health professionals association.

Once established this association will provide representation, advocacy, advice and support for Indigenous allied health professionals and students in the Indigenous health sector and be the representative body for Indigenous allied health professionals and students.

This Indigenous lead website is also for non-Indigenous allied health professionals who wish to be better informed about Indigenous Australians' culture, society and requirements of health services and who wish to contribute to strategies to improve Indigenous health in Australia.

Format:Professional body
Target audience: Indigenous allied health professionals
Accessibility:Publicly available
Cost:Free of charge
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.indigenousalliedhealth.com.au/
Updated date:2010
Organisation:National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO)
Comments:

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) is the national peak Aboriginal health body representing Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services throughout Australia. NACCHO represents local Aboriginal community control at a national level to ensure that Aboriginal people have greater access to effective health care across Australia.

Their work focuses on:

  • Promoting, developing and expanding the provision of health and well being services through local ACCHSs/AMSs
  • Liaison with organisations and Governments within both the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal community on health and wellbeing policy and planning issues
  • Representation and advocacy relating to health service delivery, health information, research, public health, health financing, health programs, etc
  • Fostering cooperative partnerships and working relationships with agencies that respect Aboriginal community control and holistic concepts of health and well being.

Links to State affiliates are available on the website.

Format:Peak body
Target audience: Approved Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations and community group
Accessibility:Information regarding membership is available: here
Cost:
Country of Origin:Australia
URL:http://www.naccho.org.au/
Updated date:2010